HARDWOOD

Hardwood Flooring

A hardwood floor is durable and gives you the style and value you desire. Hardwood flooring will add prestige to your home and can be refinished for lasting beauty. We carry most major brands like Bruce Hardwood Floors, Somerset Hardwood, UA Floors, Shaw Hardwood & Laminate, Pinnacle Hardwood, Kahrs Wood Flooring, Teragren Bamboo, Anderson Flooring, Mullican Flooring, LM Flooring, Nuvelle Hardwood ,LW Flooring, Homerwood,Armstrong, American Guild , Du Chateau Wall & Floor Coverings.

Hardwood Flooring

 We carry a large selection of hardwood floors. handscraped products , smooth finish and exotics. we also have one of the largest selections of european white oak from brands you trust. visit our flooring gallery and take home large samples , or you can request. we offer excellent product and installation knowledge that is superior to those box stores. 


Hardwood Flooring Guide

Solid

Solid hardwoods are typically 3/4" or 19mm thick, although some do come in 3/8" (10mm) or 5/16" (8mm) thicknesses. Typically the wearing thickness, i.e., the thickness that can be sanded over the lifetime of the floor, above the tongue-and-groove portion, is approximately 7/32" approaching 1/4". This type of hardwood flooring can be installed with a nail-down installation method over wood subfloors. This type of hardwood is also very susceptible to the effects of moisture and temperature, because hardwoods expand and contract with moisture and temperature changes in the atmosphere. Since hardwoods expand and contract in the width of the grain, this type of hardwood flooring is not recommended to be installed over a concrete slab, unless otherwise stated by the manufacturer. There are some instances where 3/8"-thick solid hardwood can be installed on a concrete slab.

Engineered

Rather than having one solid piece of hardwood, the engineered hardwood method uses layers of hardwood veneer to create a product that can range in thickness from 3/8" or 8mm up to 9/16" or 14mm thick. The wood veneer can range in thickness depending on the manufacturer, as will the top wearing thickness. In order to create an engineered hardwood, these veneer layers are stacked one on top of the other with the grain of adjacent layers oriented perpendicular to one other. Once the desired thickness is achieved, the boards are then cut into the correct board width. From there, the boards are then manufactured to have a tongue or groove on the edges. The final step is to add stain if necessary, and add a finish. By doing this, the engineered hardwood becomes less susceptible to the effects of moisture and temperature change, because wood expands and contracts in the width of the grain direction. Therefore engineered hardwood is referred to as being dimensionally stable. Solid hardwood does not have dimensional stability because all of the grain runs in the same direction. Because of its dimensional stability, engineered hardwood can be glued directly to concrete above or below grade, as opposed to solid hardwood which cannot.

Rotary-peel

This process involves treating the wood by boiling the log in water at a certain temperature for an allotted amount of time. Then after preparation the wood is peeled by a blade from the outside of the log, and it works its way around the log toward the center, creating a wood veneer. This veneer is then pressed flat with high pressure to make the veneer flat. This style of manufacturing tends to have problems with the wood cupping or curling back to its original shape. This problem is commonly known as "face checking" and is a manufacturing defect. Rotary-peeled engineered hardwoods tend to have a plywood appearance in the grain.

Sliced-peel

This process involves the same treatment process that the rotary peel uses. However instead of being sliced in a rotary fashion, this style of wood is sliced from the end of a log. From there it goes through the same manufacturing process as a rotary peeled product. However this style of engineered hardwood tends to have less problems with "face checking" and also does not have the same plywood appearance in the grain. However, this product can tend to have edge splintering and cracking due to the fact it has been submersed in water and then pressed flat.

Dry solid-sawn

Instead of boiling the hardwood logs, in this process they are kept at a low humidity level and dried slowly to keep moisture from inside of the wood cells. The manufacturing process to get this top veneer layer is similar to how a solid hardwood is manufactured. This style of engineered hardwood has the same look as solid hardwood, and does not have any of the potential problems of "face checking" that rotary- and slice-peel products have, because the product is not being exposed to added moisture.

Floor Finishing, Refinishing, and Sanding

Sanding provides a method for smoothing an installed floor, compensating for unevenness of the subfloor. Additionally, sanding is used to renew the appearance of older floors. No beveled edges, as seen in some premanufactured prefinished floors, will be evident in a sanded floor. Sanding using successively finer grades of sandpaper is required to ensure even stain penetration when stains are used, as well as to eliminate visible scratches from coarser sandpaper grades used initially. Prior to modern polyurethanes, oils and waxes were used in addition to stains to provide finishes. Beeswax and linseed oil, for example, are both natural crosslinking polymers which harden over time. Modern polyurethanes, and polyester resins, used occasionally, are superior in toughness and durability.

Becoming popular in recent economical troubles Wood Refinishing is a sandless alternative to refinishing wood floors. In most cases the work can be done in one day and in some you can walk on your floors the same day.

Care of Wood Floors

The appeal of a properly installed wood floor is ease of care and maintenance. Proper use of vacuuming, sweeping, and damp mopping is usually all that is required to maintain the cleanliness and appearance of a wood floor. Like tile floors, excessive grit and foot traffic will affect appearance. Unlike carpet or rugs, a properly finished wood floor, like tile, does not accumulate hidden soil or odorous compounds. Buying a hardwood floor is an important decision and significant investment. In order to choose the type of flooring that’s right for you, it’s important to know your needs and preferences in terms of design, wood species, durability, technologies and maintenance, and the many other advantages hardwood flooring provides. This guide will take you through the various types and quality options to help you choose a flooring that’s everything you want it to be. Hardwood offers many well-known advantages. It’s natural, beautiful, warm, and easy to maintain. It costs about as much as other high quality floor coverings, but it lasts dozens of years. It also creates a healthy environment, minimizing the risks of dust allergies. Available in many styles with a wide variety of features, hardwood flooring can complement any decor. Hardwood enhances a home’s interior and adds much to its resale value. Take the time to compare the many possible floor coverings and consider their benefits over the long term. Think about the feel you want to give your home. Avoid imitations —especially wood-look laminates. Natural is beautiful! Above all, choose wood because you love it’s warm, classical beauty.

Glueless engineered hardwood

This flooring consists of boards of real hardwood with a high density fiber (HDF) core and a fastening system at each end. These so-called “floating” floors get their name because they don’t need glue, nails, or staples. As they can be installed quickly and easily, they represent a practical and elegant means of owning a genuine hardwood floor that has the added advantage of being moveable Lay down a few boards and assemble them.

The tongues and grooves should fit perfectly and easily together. Check the floor yourself for uniformity by running your hand over the surface to make sure it’s even, indicating a precise cut. Irregular spacing between the boards leaves room for dirt and grime.

Finishes

The quality and durability of a finish is not determined by the number of coats, but rather by the quality of the material and the application procedure used. Applying a protective coat in factory and drying it under ultraviolet light is a popular method that has proven its worth. There are ways to tell whether a product has a good factory finish. For example, the stain should reach to the bottom of the joint to ensure a uniform color. Finish should also be applied in the joints so they don’t absorb dirt and water, which would quickly darken. Make sure the color is consistent from one box to another. Lighter woods are more likely to change color or turn yellow from the effect of intense light or the sun’s rays. To reduce and slow discoloration, some manufacturers mix a UV treatment directly into their finish. An antimicrobial agent can also be added to the finish. This treatment provides a more hygienic environment and a floor that is easier to clean.

Recognizing quality

It would be easy to believe that all hardwood floors are the same. There are so many brands and manufacturers of flooring on the market, and all promise quality. But if you learn what really constitutes quality, you’ll know what you’re looking at and you’ll see that only a few brands remain.

“V” joints

Once assembled, prefinished hardwood floor boards form a “V” joint. The V joint should be as small and as uniform as possible to hide imperfections in the subfloor. This will also prevent premature wear on board edges and make it easier to move furniture without damaging the woodor the finish. If the joint is too deep, dirt and dust will accumulate and your floor will be harder to maintain.

Warranty

Varnish applied after installation are much less wear resistant than factory finishes, and only the application is guaranteed. Prefinished floors, on the other hand, are finished with multiple coatings applied in ideal conditions and dried under ultraviolet light, and are generally guaranteed for 15, 25, or 30 years. These finishes are exceptionally durable. If you follow the maintenance procedures, they will last far beyond the warranty.

Wood flooring comes in a wide range of colors, species, and designs. It’s all a matter of taste, but a wood floor is for life. That’s why it’s so important to choose carefully. Talk to a number of experts for advice on the type of flooring that’s best for you.

Color

A stained floor gives a unique feel to each room. But be sure to select stains that will match different decors, since your wood floor will outlast any trend in home fashion. With prefinished hardwood floors, you can choose to install different colored boards to frame a room or accent a particular feature of your decor in amcontrasting color.

Species

Each species of wood has its own grain, color, and veining. Your choice of species depends on your personal preferences and the effect you want to achieve. The most popular species are oak and maple, followed by birch, ash, beech, cherry, and walnut. Exotic, deluxe woods are also available, such as Brazilian cherry, mahogany, sapele and tigerwood, which are very warm in color and extremely hard. For home use, the hardness factor is not really a serious issue. It is also important not to choose a species from pictures — ask to see a sample There are three main glosses on the market: 

High gloss: A very bright, smooth finish that tends to highlight scratches or marks of any kind and makes dirt and dust more visible.

Semi-gloss: This medium-bright finish is the standard for prefinished hardwood floors.

Low gloss: More and more popular, low gloss finish minimizes the appearance of scratches and marks. It stays looking new longer than glossy finishes.

This purchase guide provides all the information you need to make a wise choice in your hardwood flooring purchase. When you’re shopping around, always remember these three basic principles:

  • Good planning will save you unpleasant and costly surprises.

  • A knowledgeable, expert retailer will provide sound advice and successful results.

  • Purchasing a quality product will save you worries and give you peace of mind for years to come.

If you respect these principles, you’re sure to make the best choice based on your priorities, and you’ll know you’ve made a long term investment in the product that will give you the best value for your dollar.

The Janka hardness test measures the hardness of wood. It involves measuring the force required to embed a 11.28 millimeter (0.444 inch) steel ball into wood to half its diameter. This method was chosen so that the result would leave an indention 100 square millimeters in size. It is one of the best measures of the ability of a wood species to withstand denting and wear. It is also a good indicator of how hard a species is to saw or nail.
The hardness of wood usually varies with the direction of the wood grain. If testing is done on the surface of a plank, perpendicular to the grain, the test is said to be of "side hardness." Testing the cut surface of a stump would be called a test of "end hardness."

The results are stated in various ways, which can lead to confusion, especially when the name of the actual units employed is often not attached. In the United States, the measurement is in pounds-force (lbf). In Sweden it is in kilograms-force (kgf), and in Australia, either in newtons (N) or kilonewtons (kN). Sometimes the results are treated as units, e.g., "660 Janka".

A common use of Janka hardness ratings is to determine whether a species is suitable for use as flooring.

Janka Hardness Scale For Wood Flooring Species

The Janka hardness test is a measurement of the force necessary to embed a .444-inch steel ball to half its diameter in wood. It is the industry standard for gauging the ability of various species to tolerate denting and normal wear, as well as being a good indication of the effort required to either nail or saw the particular wood.
Please note that this is just a partial list containing some of the most popular choices in wood flooring as well as some of the more exotic species we carry.

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Wood  Flooring Species
Hardness

Ipe/Brazillian Walnut/Lapacho

3684

Cumuru/Brazillian Teak

3540

Ebony

3220

Brazillian Redwood/Paraju

3190

Angelim Pedra

3040

Bloodwood

2900

Red Mahogany,Turpentine

2697

Spotted Gum

2473

Brazillian Cherry/Jatoba

2350

Mesquite

2345

Santos Mahogany/Cabreuva

2200

Pradoo

2170

Brushbox

2135

Karri

2030

Sydney Blue Gum

2023

Bubinga

1980

Cameron

1940

Tallow wood

1933

Merbau

1925

Amendiom

1912

Jarrah

1910

PurpleHeart

1860

Tigerwood

1850

Hickory/Pecan/Satinwood

1820

Afzelia/Dousie

1810

Bangkirai

1798

Rosewood

1780

African Padauk

1725

Blackwood

1720

Merbau

1712

Kempas

1710

Locust

1700

Highland Beech

1686

Wenge,Red Pine

1630

Tualang

1624

Zebrawood

1575

True Pine,Timborana

1570

Peroba

1557

Kambala

1540

Sapeli

1510

Curupix

1490

Wood  Flooring Species
Hardness

Sweet Birch

1470

Hard Maple/Sugar Maple

1450

Coffee Bean

1390

Natural Bamboo(represents one species)

1380

Australian Cypress

1375

White Oak

1360

Tasmanian Oak

1350

Ribbon Gum

1349

Ash

1320

American Beech

1300

Red Oak

1290

Carribean Heart Pine

1280

Yellow Birch

1260

Movingui

1230

Heart Pine

1225

Carbonized Bamboo(represents one species)

1180

Cocobolo

1136

Brazilian Eucalyptus

1125

Makore

1100

Boreal

1023

Black Walnut

1010

Teak

1000

Sakura

995

Black Cherry

950

Boire

940

Paper Birch

910

Cedar

900

Southern Yellow Pine

870

Lacewood,Leopardwood

840

Parana

780

Sycamore

770

Shedua

710

Southern Yellow Pine

690

Douglas Fir

660

Larch

590

Chestnut

540

Hemlock

500

White Pine

420

Basswood

410

Eastern White Pine

S&M Hardwood

8300 Ulmerton Road,

Suite 104,

Largo, FL 33771

Phone. 727-623-9842

Email. info@smhardwood.com